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US hospitals getting paid to list patients as Covid-19

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Hospitals are getting paid more to list patients as Covid-19 and three times as much if the patient goes on a ventilator, according to The Spectator.

Last night Senator Dr. Scott Jensen from Minnesota went on The Ingraham Angle to discuss how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is encouraging American doctors to overcount coronavirus deaths across the US.

This was after Dr. Scott Jensen, a Minnesota physician and Republican state senator, told a local station he received a 7-page document coaching him to fill out death certificates with a Covid-19 diagnosis without a lab test to confirm the patient actually had the virus.

Dr. Jensen also disclosed that hospitals are paid more if they list patients with a Covid-19 diagnosis.

And hospitals get paid THREE TIMES AS MUCH if the patient then goes on a ventilator.

Senator Dr. Scott Jensen: Right now Medicare is determining that if you have a Covid-19 admission to the hospital you get $13,000. If that Covid-19 patient goes on a ventilator you get $39,000, three times as much. Nobody can tell me after 35 years in the world of medicine that sometimes those kinds of things impact on what we do.

Correction: 15 April 2020: The original story suggested the American Medical Association (AMA) issued guidance to physicians on how to report Covid-19 deaths. The story has been corrected to reflect the CDC as the source of this guidance. We regret the error.

1 COMMENT

  1. […] Awake: That is correct. But it’s not really me saying it. I’m just telling it. But it get worse! Did you know that MediCare has incentivized hospitals and nursing homes to classify as many patients as they can as having Covid? The average payment for a Covid diagnosis is about $10,000. If the patient is placed on a dangerous (often deadly) ventilator, the reimbursement grows to a whopping $40,000. To top it off, the government will also issue payments for “end-of-life” care. (here) […]

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